From memoirs to self-help guides, learn about anorexia and bulimia resources

An estimated 10 million women and one million men in the United States suffer from an eating disorder, according to the Eating Disorder Foundation. If you’re seeking help for yourself or someone you care about, talk with an expert.

In addition, we recommend the following books and DVDs:

  • “Letting Ana Go” tells the story of a girl who seems to have it all. But as she struggles with meeting expectations, she turns to controlling food as a way to take charge of her life. Weight loss comes to mean success, all documented in a moving diary that reveals the toll and tragedy of eating disorders. Learn more about “Letting Ana Go”
  • “Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia (P.S.)” is a fascinating memoir by best-selling author Marya Hornbacher. In it, she reveals how she first fight to lose weight – and then battled to recover. It’s a stark, insightful journey through the looking glass of eating disorders. Learn more about “Wasted: A Memoir”
  • What happens when a woman specializing in documentaries and photography explores life within an eating disorders treatment facility? The answer is “Thin,” an exploration into the lives of brave girls and women who revealed their stories in hopes of helping others. Included with their personal stories are essays on the sociology and science of eating disorders by renowned researchers Joan Jacobs Brumberg, Dr. David Herzog, and Dr. Michael Strober. Learn more about “Thin” by clicking here. Also recommended: HBO’s original documentary showcasing those patients: Get the details on the DVD
  • “You can never be too rich or too thin” has become a familiar saying. But Susan Sarandon proves why the “too thin” element can be deadly in the documentary “Dying to Be Thin”
  • Discover how to know if a “problem” might be an eating disorder by clicking here for “Almost Anorexic: Is My (or My Loved One’s) Relationship with Food a Problem? (The Almost Effect).”

How to Lose Weight As a Pear Shape

Someone with a pear-shaped body gains most of her weight below her waist. Her thighs, hips and buttocks get larger long before her chest, shoulders and stomach. Luckily, weight in your legs and thighs is easier to lose than fat around your abdomen, according to Martica Heaner, M.A., M.Ed. With proper diet and exercise along with a lower-body focus, you should be able to lose weight despite your pear shape.

  1. Watch what you eat. Avoid foods that are high in fat, especially if they feature saturated or trans fat. Include fruits and vegetables with each meal along with lean proteins such as turkey, fish and kidney beans.
  2. Avoid consuming too many calories each day. Use a calorie counter to determine how many calories you need to eat in order to maintain your current weight and pear shape. You can find a sample calculator on the American Cancer Society website. To lose weight, consume fewer calories than the number determined by the calculator.